My Favorite Holiday

Today is the day that I wait for all year long. The day that I count down to, hold in high regards and count as my very favorite holiday. It is of course, Halloween.

  
Not.

Today, although it is known by that name here in the States, it is known by a far older, more sacred name. Today is Samhain (pronounced Sow-en). So today, I would like to explain what this holiday actually means.

Mainstream media has shown that Halloween is a holiday about candy, costumes and blood and gore. In fact, some of the first images we are taught to associate with this holiday are candy corn, green bumpy skinned witches and little red devils with red plastic pitchforks. We see the Wicked Witch of the West, evil and cackling. We see the TV shows like Salem and American Horror Story which perpetuate the stereotypes. We see the Sanderson sisters, the Bennett line, people who could be just scary enough or sexy enough to fit the ticket. There is pumpkin carving, apple cider and a whole gambit of goblins, ghosts and ghouls. 

What I know this holiday to be is a new year celebration. It is an ending of the harvest season and the beginning of the earth’s slumber. Soon enough, the skies will turn grey and little diamonds will fall from the sky, placing all things green in a state of rest. But more than that, it is a time of rememberance. Those who have been lost to this earth, those who have left lasting impressions on their posterity. It is a time to honor your ancestors and reimmerse yourself in becoming the best person you can be. Samhain is a time of reverence and recollection, as well as a time to prepare for the upcoming year. It is a time that the veil is open.

  
But what do I mean by that? What veil? As I mentioned earlier, it is a time for thankfulness and ancestor rememberance. But the thing is, it is also a time to connect with that ancestral line. Personally, I offer my ancestors a memorial. I pull out some potatoes, some apples and some wine and leave a little offering, honoring their spirits (I’m Russo-Irish, and wine is a nice compromise for the English blood within). The thing is, I know that I am a product of their choices. Their choices to immigrate to America, their choices to work hard and produce the best life they could for their children, and thusly me. I am incredibly proud that my grandfather was a first generation American. I honor those decisions and am thankful for their bravery. It is this day that is believed to be the closest the spiritual realm can come to the physical one, a day when ancestors can communicate with us. I find this incredibly comforting.

Samhain is a celtic holiday and there is an astounding history there within. And although I could go on and on about the history and the meaning, I want to bring in an explanation about the whole concept. I think it provides a great history and a readable explanation.

http://www.paganspath.com/magik/samhain-history.htm

Anyway, the important message I want to share is that there are plenty of people out in the great wide world who do not see this holiday as a joke, a big Trick-or-Treat bonanza that involves werewolves and vampires and children-eating-green-skinned-witches. We see this as a holy day, a day to honor those who came before us and a day to enable a precious connection between who we are and who we have become. So the next time you think about taking your kids out in a costume, just remember that although Hollywood may have given you the idea that “sexy” costumes and stereotypical symbolism is acceptable, perhaps there is another way of thinking.

Have a wonderful Halloween, All Hallow’s Eve, Samhain (Beltane if you are in the Southern Hemisphere) and the wide plethora of holidays coming up: All Saint’s Day, All Soul’s Day and Dia de Los Muertos (plus any I may have forgotten).

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Where I Come From

For the longest time I was a member of ancestry.com. I simply couldn’t afford to pay the fees, and had to take a brief pause. However, before I left, I was able to find the name of the town my great grandfather came from as well as the boat he sailed on to come to America. Also of interest, I found the church that a 7x great grandfather was baptised in.

There is no problem locating the church, as it is in Ireland, and the records are quite precise.

But I cannot find the little town that my Russian great grandfather came from. So I guess, if anyone has any idea how to go about finding it, or knows anything about small places in Russia which may or may not exist anymore, I’d be interested in speaking with you.